Publications

Selected Recent

Rafique, SJ., Solomon-Harris, L., & Steeves, J.K.E. (2015) Connectivity of object and scene processing: consecutive TMS and fMR-Adaptation. Neuropsychologia, 79(Pt. A), 86-96, doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.027

Moro, S.S., Kelly, K.R., McKetton, L., Gallie, B.L. & Jennifer K.E. Steeves. (2015) Evidence of multisensory plasticity: Asymmetrical medial geniculate body in people with one eye Neuroimage:Clinical, 9, 513-518. 1016/j.nicl.2015.09.016

Kelly, K., DeSimone, K., Gallie, B.L. & Steeves, J. (2015) Altered brain morphology following long-term survival from early monocular enucleation. Neuroimage:Clinical, 7, 297-305, doi:10.1016/j.nicl.2014.11.020.

Moro, S.S., Harris, L.R. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2014). Optimal audiovisual integration in people with one eye. Multisensory Research, 27, 173-178.

Kelly, K.R., McKetton, L., Schneider, K.A., Gallie, B.L. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2014). Altered anterior visual system development following early monocular enucleation. Neuroimage: Clinical, 1(4), 72-81.

Mullin, C. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2013). Consecutive TMS-fMRI reveals an inverse relationship in BOLD signal. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(49), 19243-9.

Moro, S.S. & Steeves, J. K. E. (2013). No Colavita effect: Increasing temporal load maintains equal auditory and visual processing in people with one eye, Neuroscience Letters, 556, 186-90.

Solomon-Harris, L., Mullin, C.R. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2013). TMS to the “occipital face area” affects face recognition but not categorization. Brain and Cognition. 83(3), 245-51.

Verdichevski, M. & Steeves, J.K.E (2013). Own-age and own-sex biases in recognition of aged faces. Acta Psychologica. 144(2):418-23.

Kelly, K.R., Zohar, S., Gallie, B.L. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2013). Impaired speed perception but intact luminance contrast perception in people with one eye. Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Science, 54(4), 3058-64.

Ganaden, R., Mullin, C.R. & Steeves, J.K.E. (2013). TMS to the TOS impairs scene but not object categorization. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, (6):961-8.

Please Jennifer Steeves for reprints