Ongoing Lab Studies

1. Treating visual hallucinations in those with vision loss

If you experience visual hallucinations as a result of loss of vision and interested in participating in our study to develop treatment for these visual hallucinations, please contact Sara Rafique on the details below. Your participation will contribute to the advancement of scientific knowledge, better understanding and treatment for this condition.

If you are a healthy person (aged 40 years and over) and are interested in helping contribute to this research or may know a friend or family member suffering from this condition, we would also like to hear from you.

Please contact Sara Rafique: srafique@yorku.ca if you are interested in volunteering to participate. Tel: (416) 736-2100 ext. 22680.

2. Behavioural Audiovisual Integration Studies

Participants are required to look at a computer screen and respond based on different auditory and visual stimuli. Several different studies are available to participate in that range from 20 minutes to 1 hour in length.

Please contact Stefania Moro: smoro@yorku.ca if you are interested in volunteering to participate.

3. fMRI Audiovisual Integration Studies

Participants are required to respond to different auditory and visual stimuli while getting their brain scanned in the MRI located in the Sherman Health Science Research Centre at York University.

Please contact Stefania Moro: smoro@yorku.ca if you are interested in volunteering to participate.

4. Effects of TMS in the “Occipital Face Area”: a consecutive TMS-fMRI study

In this project, we use image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) followed by an fMR-adaptation paradigm. We aim to better understand the face processing network by creating temporary "neuronal noise" in specific areas and study the effects in other regions of the face processing network.

* We are not recruiting volunteers for this project

5. The effect of transiently disrupting object search and detection in scenes using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

Our research team is working to understand how the brain searches for objects in a scene. The purpose of this study is to determine which brain regions are involved in locating objects in a scene.

Please contact Francisco Parreira or Sara Rafique: franparr@yorku.ca or srafique@yorku.ca if you are interested in volunteering to participate.

6. The role of sexual orientation in perceptual processing

Research has suggested a sex difference in a number of similar tasks relating to visual cognition. For example, sex differences have been identified in face perception ability (the brain’s process of interpreting and recognizing human faces) as well as in the mental rotation of spatial form. Studies have also indicated that not only sex but sexual orientation can predict performance on some of these cognitive tasks, particularly in males. The purpose of this study is to explore any existing relationship between performance on visual cognitive tests such as face processing and mental rotation and the sexual orientation of the participant.

Please contact Khaldon Abbas or Francisco Parreira: khal95@my.yorku.ca or franparr@yorku.ca if you are interested in volunteering to participate.